PHOENIX (AP) - The Latest on a lawsuit against a voter-approved minimum wage increase in Arizona (all times local):

7:26

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey and legislative leaders are putting pressure on the state Supreme Court to block a voter-approved minimum wage increase that's set to take effect in four days.

House Speaker-elect J.D. Mesnard and Senate President-elect Steve Yarbrough, both Republicans, filed an amicus brief on Wednesday urging the court to block Proposition 206 while it is challenged in court. Ducey's Office of Strategic Planning & Budgeting joined their filing.

The lawsuit filed by the Arizona Chamber of Commerce argues that even though Proposition 206 exempts state employees, Arizona must boost pay for health contractors and cover costs to enforce the law. They say the measure includes no required funding source.

A judge last week refused to block the measure, and the chamber and other business groups filed an appeal.

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5:35 p.m.

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich has filed his response in a lawsuit against the voter-approved minimum wage increase that is now in the hands of the state Supreme Court.

Brnovich says blocking Proposition 206, which is set to take effect on Sunday, would violate strong public policy that favors democracy through initiatives. The measure increases the minimum wage from $8.05 an hour to $10 an hour next year.

The lawsuit by the Arizona Chamber of commerce and other business groups argues that the part of the measure requiring employers to provide sick time violates rules saying initiatives can only address one subject. It says Prop. 206 forces the state to boost pay for some contractors and to pay to enforce the law.

A trial judge rejected both arguments last week in a ruling now being appealed by the Chamber.

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4:33 p.m.

Maricopa County has filed a brief in support of a lawsuit challenging a voter-approved minimum wage increase, saying it will also be hurt by the measure.

The county filed the amicus brief on Wednesday saying that Proposition 206 puts county government in an "untenable" position.

The proposition raises the minimum wage from $8.05 to $10 on Jan. 1 and $12 in 2020.

The county says in the court filing that about six percent of school district employees would be affected by the law.

The Arizona Supreme Court is expected to decide whether the law will take effect while it is challenged in court.

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The state Supreme Court is set to decide whether hundreds of thousands of Arizona workers see a boost in their pay starting Jan. 1 under terms of a voter-approved measure boosting minimum wages.

The Arizona Chamber of Commerce is leading a coalition of business groups urging the court to block the increase. They argue that even though Proposition 206 exempts state employees Arizona must boost pay for health contractors and cover costs to enforce the law. They say the measure includes no required funding source.

The Chamber also argues the measure illegally includes a second provision, mandatory sick pay.

A trial judge rejected both arguments last week. Attorney General Mark Brnovich's office and Proposition 206 proponents are defending the law.

A high court decision is expected this week.