It's a touching story of 17-year-old Ezequias Fuentes who once spent the night at a park with his nine siblings and his mother.

Now, he's on his way in becoming an entrepreneur after he graduates from high school. He wants to create his own motivational nonprofit to inspire other struggling students like him to not give up.

"Use what you have to get what you need. Use your story. Use who you are. Use what you have been through," said Fuentes.

Fuentes currently attends Camelback High School, and thanks to his perseverance in searching for better opportunities, he decided to join a program for high school students called Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA!).

"This program is designed for high school students who want to start businesses, who are interested in business or want to know more about entrepreneurship," said Lynda Bishop who is the academy's program director.

The program is 28 weeks long and only 24 students a year from various high schools around the Valley are selected to potentially establish a business.

"We build out a full business plan, a marketing plan. They have websites. They have marketing materials and professional logos," said Bishop.

Bishop says the program is mainly designed to help guide their students with real-life experiences in becoming an entrepreneur.

"When you think about what a real entrepreneur is, it's somebody who takes personal responsibility, it's somebody who can take an idea and put it into the real world," said Bishop.

One of Fuente's first efforts for his business is creating a motivational bracelet with specific phrases to remind people who may be struggling, why they need to keep moving forward with their goals.

"A lot of us usually doubt ourselves. A lot of us at certain times when we go through certain things, and at just that moment, we put ourselves down," said Fuentes about why he wants to create motivational bracelets. "Those kind of moments can tear someone a part if we don't remember where we come from."

Fuentes says that the instability in his life and having to provide for himself at such a young age taught him that he can do anything he puts his heart into.

"We're the next generation to fill that White House, we're the next generation to have our voice be said," said Fuentes.

Fuentes hopes that he can start a movement with his nonprofit that will motivate other high school students.

He agrees that he doesn't want other kids his age to be afraid to use their stories, their culture and voice to make a difference.

"I'm still on the journey, myself today. So that's why I feel youth around the world would love to join my journey," said Fuentes. "Because they're not doing it on their own, but I am with them as well."

The Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and Arizona Lottery have recently teamed up to help the YEA! program with additional funds.

If you would like to know information about the international YEA! program, please visit youthentrepreneurs.org.