The #RedForEd teacher walkout is the biggest political story in Arizona in decades, according to political insiders on this weekend's "Sunday Square Off."

So what comes next?

Our Left/Right panel of Republican consultant Barrett Marson and attorney Roy Herrera, a former Democratic congressional aide, discuss:

  • The top takeaways from Arizona teachers' historic six-day strike and the two months of activism that preceded it.
  • Why the first "truth test" for Gov. Doug Ducey's proposed 20-percent teacher raises over three years could come before the August primary.
  • Why two statewide votes on education initiatives could leave voters confused.

Also on "Sunday Square Off":

  • An update on a flip-flop by the proposed "tax the rich" initiative to fund schools.
  • What are the state universities' "freedom schools" and why are GOP legislators and the governor so eager to hand over millions of dollars in funding? Rachel Leingang, higher education reporter for the Arizona Republic, explains.
  • We verify a major political and legal question arising from Sen. John McCain's illness: If his U.S. Senate becomes vacant for any reason, who gets to fill it - Arizona voters or the governor?

"Sunday Square Off" airs at 8 a.m. Sundays on 12 News, after NBC's "Meet the Press."

Top takeaways from historic #RedForEd strike

"Sunday Square Off's" Left/Right panel discusses the top takeaways from Arizona teachers' historic six-day strike and the two months of activism that preceded it.

How energized Arizona educators could affect 2018 vote

The first "truth test" for Gov. Doug Ducey's proposed 20 percent teacher raises over three years could come before the August primary.

Why GOP's so eager to fund Arizona's ‘freedom schools’

What are the state universities' "freedom schools" and why are GOP legislators and the governor so eager to hand over millions of dollars in taxpayer funding?

Verify: Would Ducey or voters fill a U.S. Senate vacancy?

We verify a major political and legal question arising from Sen. John McCain's illness: If his U.S. Senate becomes vacant for any reason, who would fill it -- Arizona voters or the governor?