Americans are likely more aware of mental health now than they ever have been before. Plenty of people take mental health days, talk about their therapy appointments or joke about a breakdown.

But a joke isn't therapy and there's still a barrier to entry for some who aren't sure where to turn or if they are covered by insurance to see a therapist. Still others have difficulty with the stigma of seeking mental health care.

There are clinics and other resources around Phoenix and Arizona, but they aren't always the easiest to find.

If you are in need of immediate help, you can call 911 or reach the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or chat with someone online.

If your situation is not immediate, you have some options.

You can find behavior health treatment services near you by putting your address or zip code into this locator on the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administrations' website.

If you'd rather speak to someone on the phone, call 1-800-662-4357 (HELP).

Veterans can contact their local VA, which should help guide you to services you need. For veterans in crisis, there is a hotline: 1-800-273-8255.

If you are employed, you can go to your human resources department to see if your employer has information on mental health services covered by your insurance or on-site counseling options.

Most schools, colleges and universities have mental health services available to students. Visit your school's website to find your school's resources.

Mental Health America and the National Alliance on Mental Illness both have affiliated clinics nationwide providing services.

If you are looking for evidence-based treatment, the Secular Therapy Project is a good place to start. For the religious, your church or group leader may be able to direct you to resources.