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'I will do my part': Lt. Gov. takes pay cut amid state budget shortfall

He is cutting his own salary by 14 percent.

ATLANTA — Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan announced that he will cut his state salary by 14 percent for the 2020-2021 budget cycle.

Gov. Brian Kemp announced last week that there would be cuts across every department in the state as Georgia looks to rebound from the economic crisis caused by COVID-19. 

“As we work through the budget process ahead of us it will be necessary for everyone to make sacrifices, and I will do my part and take a cut as well,” said Lt. Governor Duncan. “The fiscal impact of the coronavirus on our state’s budget is severe, and the General Assembly is tasked with making serious cuts to government services and programs, which will affect the lives of the Georgians we serve.

"These are difficult times accompanied by a lot of uncertainty, but we are all a team and meaningful savings will come as we work together to make the required adjustments.”

In March, Duncan himself announced he was self-quarantining after a member of the Georgia State Senate tested positive for COVID-19. 

The state has a sizable rainy day fund for use in emergencies, and Gov. Kemp has already tapped into it for hurricane and pandemic relief. It’s not likely to give budget writers any wiggle room, however. The question may become whether his demand for 14 percent cuts will be deep enough.

11Alive is focusing our news coverage on the facts and not the fear around the virus.  We want to keep you informed about the latest developments while ensuring that we deliver confirmed, factual information. 

We will track the most important coronavirus elements relating to Georgia on this page. Refresh often for new information. 

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