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Coronavirus in Arizona on Jan. 26: 4,748 new cases, 209 new deaths reported Tuesday, one year after first reported case

There have been 732,643 confirmed cases of coronavirus and 12,448 coronavirus-related deaths reported in Arizona as of Tuesday.

PHOENIX — Editor's note: Here is the live blog for Jan. 27. 

In an effort to track the changes with the coronavirus outbreak in Arizona, 12 News has started a daily live blog.

Here is the live blog for Tuesday, Jan. 26.

Major updates: 

  • There have been 732,643 confirmed cases of coronavirus and 12,448 coronavirus-related deaths reported in Arizona as of Tuesday.
  • The state does not record how many people have recovered, but Johns Hopkins University estimates the number of people who have recovered.
  • You can find COVID-19 testing sites here.
  • Go to 12News.com/Vaccine to find more information on the COVID-19 vaccines.
  • Scroll down to see how many cases are in each ZIP code and additional information.
  • Maricopa County says it will honor canceled vaccine appointments.

RELATED: COVID-19 vaccine in Arizona: Frequently Asked Questions

COVID-19 cases reported in Arizona on Tuesday

There have been 732,643 confirmed cases of coronavirus and 12,448 coronavirus-related deaths reported in Arizona, according to the state's latest numbers.

That's an increase from the 727,895 confirmed cases and 12,239 coronavirus-related deaths reported on Monday.

A week ago, there were 685,699 cases and 11,266 deaths reported in Arizona.

LEER EN ESPANOL: Coronavirus en Arizona el 26 de enero: 4,748 nuevos casos, 209 muerte se reportan el martes

4,748 new cases, 209 new deaths reported Tuesday

The Arizona Department of Health Services reported 4,748 new cases and 209 new deaths on Tuesday.

The department did not say whether the high death count was due to death certificate matching

Arizona has been a national virus hot spot during both the surge last summer and the even deadlier one this fall and winter. 

The Department of Health Services announced the state’s first case on Jan. 26, 2020, saying it was a Maricopa County resident who had recently returned from travel to Wuhan, China, a city that was at the epicenter of the outbreak.

Arizona has administered 486,338 COVID-19 vaccine doses as of Monday.

The department said all the vaccine appointments for February are booked at both state-run sites. It was not immediately known when appointments for March would be made available.

The department reports the number of new cases on the day the cases were reported to them by counties and hospitals, not on the day when someone was diagnosed with the virus.

Arizona reached 700,000 coronavirus cases on Jan. 22, 600,000 on Jan. 9, 500,000 on Dec. 28, 400,000 on Dec. 12, 300,000 on Nov. 23, 200,000 on Aug. 27, 100,000 on July 6 and 50,000 cases on June 21. 

The state reached 12,000 coronavirus deaths on Jan. 22, 11,000 on Jan. 15, 10,000 on Jan. 9, 9,000 on Jan. 1, 8,000 on Dec. 22, 7,000 on Dec. 9, 6,000 on Nov. 3, 5,000 on Aug. 29, 4,000 on Aug. 6, 3,000 deaths on July 23, 2,000 on July 9 and 1,000 on June 5.

Arizona's Rt, pronounced r-naught, was at 0.97 on Sunday, the same as Saturday.

The Rt is essentially a mathematical number that shows whether more people are becoming infected or less.

The concern is that any Rt over 1, no matter how small, means the virus may grow exponentially.

RELATED: This is the number that health officials are watching closely in the fight against COVID-19 (And you should too)

There were 11,929 cases reported on the collection date of Jan. 4, the day with the most collected diagnoses so far. The day with the second-most collected diagnoses so far was on Dec. 28, with 11,533 cases. That is subject to change.

Health officials said the day with the highest number of deaths was Jan. 5, when 137 people died. The day with the second-highest number of deaths was Jan. 4, when 133 people died. That is subject to change.

Health officials continued to stress that people should continue social distancing, wearing masks in public, and stay home when possible.

Gov. Ducey issues advisory to accelerate vaccine distribution

Governor Doug Ducey issued an advisory to accelerate the statewide distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine Tuesday. 

The advisory requires health care providers and local health agencies who administer the COVID-19 vaccine to report data to the Arizona Department of Health Services in order to determine the pace vaccination distribution is moving, according to a statement from ADHS. 

It also allows the state to reallocate doses to where they will be most quickly distributed and extends the requirement for hospitals, testing laboratories, and other health care facilities to report detailed information about COVID-19, the statement explained. 

“The COVID-19 vaccination is our best shot at returning to life as it should be. Over the last two weeks, the COVID-19 vaccination site at State Farm Stadium has become a national model for vaccine administration,” said Governor Ducey. 

“With adequate vaccine doses, we can build on this success, both at our existing vaccination sites, and at additional sites across the state. This advisory will provide transparency in the pace of vaccination administration, and allow us to direct vaccine doses to where they will be most rapidly distributed.”

There have been 486,338 vaccinations administered in Arizona as of Tuesday.

"Both ADHS-operated sites are capable of administering 6,000-12,000 vaccinations per day, but with limited vaccine doses available, the sites are operating at partial capacity. Last week, the federal government denied a request by ADHS to allocate 300,000 additional vaccine doses per week to Arizona. As a result, the Phoenix Municipal Stadium will launch with just 500 appointments scheduled per day," the statement said.  

ADHS health officials said the advisory will provide "better insight into the pace of vaccine distribution by local health agencies and healthcare providers."

Some providers have reported as much as 100 percent of their supply of the vaccine have yet to be administered. 

"This order will require local health agencies and healthcare providers to report their plans to administer unused doses and allow ADHS to redirect unused vaccine doses and accelerate delivery across the state. As additional vaccine doses are secured, ADHS aims to expand its vaccination sites in northern, central, and western regions.," the statement explained.

Grand Canyon University opens as COVID-19 vaccination site

As Arizona works to vaccinate more people to slow the spread of COVID-19, Grand Canyon University opened a vaccination site on its campus.

You must go through Maricopa County in order to schedule a COVID-19 vaccine appointment at GCU. The county is currently only taking appointments for Phase 1A and people over 75 in Phase 1B. 

State-run second-dose appointments booked through Feb. 17

The Arizona Department of Health Services said appointments for people to get their second COVID-19 vaccine doses through the state are booked through mid-February.

RELATED: ONE YEAR LATER: Recorded phone calls reveal Crisis in Care through COVID-19 surge in AZ

Maricopa County says it will honor canceled vaccine appointments

Maricopa County Public Health said its vaccination sites would be open Tuesday for scheduled appointments. 

Officials said canceled appointments at Banner Sun City West and the Central Fairground vaccine sites would be rescheduled for later dates. People were asked to not go to those sites for make-up appointments.

The Goodyear or Chandler locations would accept people with canceled appointments due to weather closures on Monday. They were asked to bring their confirmation and proof of eligibility with them.

Arizona allocates more funding to expand outdoor dining

Gov. Doug Ducey announced Tuesday that his office provided an additional $1 million to expand outdoor dining throughout the state. 

More details can be found below.

Northern Arizona COVID-19 testing, vaccine sites to close for weather

Cactus League asks MLB to delay spring training due to COVID

The Cactus League and Arizona community leaders have asked Major League Baseball to delay the start of spring training due to coronavirus concerns just over three weeks before pitchers and catchers are supposed to report. 

The Cactus League made the request in a letter to Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred obtained by The Associated Press. 

The letter was co-signed by the mayors of Mesa, Scottsdale, Surprise, Glendale, Goodyear and Peoria, as well as representatives from Phoenix and the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community. 

Arizona is averaging just under 7,000 new coronavirus cases per day.

The above article is from The Associated Press. 

RELATED: Cactus League, Valley leaders ask MLB to delay spring training due to COVID-19 pandemic

GOP lawmakers take aim at Ducey's pandemic emergency powers

Arizona legislative Republicans are pushing to cut off broad emergency powers that Gov. Doug Ducey has used to restrict large gatherings and business occupancy during the coronavirus pandemic.

A Senate committee voted Monday to end the public health emergency that gives the state access to millions of dollars in federal funds and expands Ducey’s powers. 

The Government Committee also advanced various proposals that would make it easier for lawmakers to shut down the governor’s powers during a future emergency. 

Supporters say the Republican governor should be able to take immediate actions to respond to a pressing emergency but eventually the Legislature should have a say. 

Democrats say involving lawmakers would slow and politicize the process.

The above article is from The Associated Press. 

Navajo Nation reports 89 new COVID-19 cases, 4 more deaths

Navajo Nation health officials on Monday reported 89 new COVID-19 cases and four more deaths as a revised public health order is set to take effect.

The latest figures bring the total reported coronavirus cases on the reservation to 27,573 with 977 known deaths. 

On Monday, the tribe extended its stay-at-home order with a revised nightly curfew to limit the spread of COVID-19. 

The Navajo Department of Health has identified 53 communities with uncontrolled spread of the coronavirus, down from 75 communities in recent weeks. 

The Navajo Nation also is lifting weekend lockdowns to allow more vaccination events. 

The Navajo Nation extends into Arizona, New Mexico and Utah.

The above article is from The Associated Press. 

Arizona health department sets up hotline to report businesses

The Arizona Department of Health Services has set up two ways for people to report local businesses that are not following COVID-19 guidelines. 

People can report businesses through a hotline or through an online form:

“There’s a role for the public as well: If you believe a business isn’t following these requirements, which were established for the safety of customers, employees, and the broader public, ADHS encourages you to share your concerns so local and state officials can follow up as needed,” AZDHS said in a statement.

Free masks available for some Arizonans

The Arizona Department of Health Services announced that some Arizonans would be able to get free masks from the state.

The department partnered with Hanes to provide free face masks to Arizona’s most vulnerable populations.

Anyone who is part of a vulnerable population (including, but not limited to, individuals with medical conditions or individuals age 65 or older), a student (or parents on behalf of students), school staff member or who may not be able to purchase one is able to get a free mask.

Each other will provide five washable, reusable cloth face masks, one order per household. 

The department hopes to give out two million cloth face masks. 

Anyone with questions can visit the department's FAQs page or contact Hanes at 1-800-503-6698.

Sign up for the free masks here.

Arizona releases ZIP code locations of coronavirus cases, other data

The Arizona Department of Health Services has released expanded data points regarding coronavirus cases in the state. 

The AZDHS website now features the location of confirmed cases in Arizona by zip code. 

You can see the current ZIP code map here and can find yours by clicking around or searching for your ZIP code in the top right of the map.

More information on coronavirus cases from Tuesday

There have been 732,643 confirmed cases of coronavirus and 12,448 coronavirus-related deaths reported in Arizona.

That's an increase from the 727,895 confirmed cases and 12,239 coronavirus-related deaths reported on Monday.

There were 4,748 new cases reported on Tuesday, a decrease from the 5,321 new cases reported on Monday.

There were 209 new deaths reported on Tuesday, an increase from the one new death reported on Monday.

There were 11,929 cases reported on the collection date of Jan. 4, the day with the most collected diagnoses so far. The day with the second-most collected diagnoses so far was on Dec. 28, with 11,533 cases. That is subject to change.

Health officials said the day with the highest number of deaths was Jan. 5, when 137 people died. The day with the second-highest number of deaths was Jan. 4, when 133 people died. That is subject to change.

In total, 13,229 new tests were reported on Tuesday, a decrease from the 16,660 new tests reported on Monday.

There have been a total of 3,792,478 PCR and Serology tests reported to the state as of Tuesday. 

14.1% of those tests have been positive as of Tuesday, the same since Sunday.

Here's a breakdown of the number of cases in each county:

  • Maricopa: 455,830
  • Pima: 98,034
  • Pinal: 40,533
  • Coconino: 14,894
  • Navajo: 14,120
  • Apache: 9,283
  • Mohave: 18,528
  • La Paz: 2,177
  • Yuma: 34,543
  • Graham: 4,832
  • Cochise: 10,248
  • Santa Cruz: 7,355
  • Yavapai: 15,929
  • Gila: 5,824
  • Greenlee: 513

Click on the links below to find more information from each county's health department: 

COVID-19 is believed to be primarily spread through coughs or sneezes. 

It may be possible for the virus to spread by touching a surface or object with the virus and then a person touching their mouth, nose or eyes, but this is not thought to be the main method of spread, the CDC says. 

You should consult your doctor if you traveled to an area currently affected by COVID-19 and feel sick with fever, cough or difficulty breathing. 

There is no vaccine for the coronavirus, so the best way to prevent COVID-19 and other respiratory diseases is to:

  • Wear face coverings while in public.
  • Practice social distancing while in public.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently-touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

You can text FACTS to 602-444-1212 to receive more information on the coronavirus and to ask questions.