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Coping with stress and emotions during the pandemic

If you are or someone you know is struggling, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The coronavirus outbreak is spreading beyond our physical health. Most Americans are experiencing a variety of emotions, ranging from anxiety to sadness.

Many are struggling with finding ways to cope with the increasing stress.

The State of North Carolina loosening rules around telehealth and have expanded crisis hotlines to get residences the help they need. 

According to the NC Department of Health and Human Services, people are turning to crisis hotlines for help.

The N.C. Suicide Prevention Lifeline gets around 325 calls a day. The Hope 4 NC Helpline sees about 44 callers every day, which officials say there has been an increase in volume calls for this hotline.

"In the hope line, in particular, we will see an uptick just day over day, I think we'll see a peak six months after this ends", Kody Kinsley N.C. Department of Health and Human Services’ deputy secretary for behavioral health and intellectual and developmental disabilities said. 

The Hope 4 NC helpline connects North Carolinian's to additional mental health support, whatever it may be. In the past, it was used for hurricane recovery efforts, now statewide during the pandemic. 

"13 hundred people die for suicide in the state of North Carolina, 13 hundred deaths that are completely preventable" Kody Kinsley N.C. Department of Health and Human Services’ deputy secretary for behavioral health and intellectual and developmental disabilities said. 

Relationships strained, workers, overwhelmed, millions struggling to make ends meet, that's why checking in on your loved ones may be more important now than ever.

RELATED: Call '**Ask': mental health emergency hotline launches for North Carolinians

RELATED: More stress, more isolation: Coronavirus heightening concerns over mental health

"If you think someone might be suicidal, you can not hold back, ask them straight out, are you suicidal, do you have a plan," Mental Health Advocate, Fonda Bryant said. 

Bryant says there are several warning signs of suicide. For example, a person not eating or sleeping, or giving away prized possession. 

"People need to check on each other and  don't assume, you know, they just want attention, they're just having a bad day, because when you set up and assume, it could cost someone their life," Bryant said. 

 Bryant is also offering a free suicide prevention course called QPR training. 

The virtual QPR training is on Wednesdays from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. and Saturdays from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m., click HERE.

If you need the suicide prevention hotline, that number is 1-800-273-8255.

You can also text "HOME" to 741741.

The number for Hope 4 NC is 1-855-587-3463.

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