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'They want that instant fame': 'Killfie' craze claiming young lives worldwide

"You take the idea of adrenaline rush and you mix it with likes and comments and you put those two things together, it becomes this one-upping mentality until somebody inevitably dies."

<p>Dangerous pictures are a new trend online. (Photo: Instagram screenshot)</p>

PHOENIX - This might sound ridiculous to some, but selfies are turning deadly for adrenaline junkies who are pushing the limits.

Research conducted at Cornell University shows 127 people actually died while taking selfies over the course of a two-year span. 

"Kids keep pushing the boundaries because they want that instant fame," says social media expert Adam Brooks.

Brooks is the author of "The Social Media Handbook." Brooks says this horrifying craze is a product of today's obsession with internet fame.

"You take the idea of adrenaline rush and you mix it with likes and comments and you put those two things together it becomes, this one-upping mentality until somebody inevitably dies."

Just do a quick internet search of "dangerous selfies," or "killfies" and hundreds of pictures will pop up showing people taking pictures on top of building or bridges.

 

"Most of us as kids did things that were dangerous. We did things that you know pushed that adrenaline but that was riding your bike off a ramp. It wasn't leaning over a bridge or walking in front of a train," Brooks says.

The majority of these deaths happen to those between the ages of 20 and 24 years old, meaning this definitely seems isolated to that generation.

Brooks suggests having a real conversation with your children about why potential likes and retweets are not worth the risk.