Maricopa Co. attorney: 'Lack of cooperation' from parents in Hamilton hazing case

Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery said the purpose of addressing parents in Tuesday night's meeting was to dissuade parents who think being involved in the Hamilton High School abuse case could somehow have a negative impact on their child's schola

Maricopa County Attorney Bill Montgomery held a news conference Wednesday to address the Hamilton hazing investigation, just one day after holding a public meeting for parents.

Montgomery said investigators need parents to assist in their process, but there's been a "lack of cooperation."

Montgomery believes there is evidence that shows the allegations at the center of the hazing investigation are true, but wants more before moving forward with potential charges.

According to Montgomery, a case has been submitted by the Chandler Police Department and is under review by his office. But making a charging decision now, he said, would limit the scope of the case, adding it would "affect fewer victims" than he believes exist.

FULL COVERAGE: 12news.com/Hamilton

Montgomery said he's confident the number of victims would expand if more people come forward with information.

"We know there are more victims," he said. "We'll make a charging decision once we're confident we have all the information we're going to get."

Montgomery called the public meeting Tuesday to urge people to come forward. He's pushing to eliminate fears any parents or potential victims may have about coming forward, speaking out or damaging a prestigious Valley football program.

Montgomery said his office stands ready to help, adding they're "exactly the type of victims we can help."

The attorney's office has not been in communication with the Chandler Unified School District as far as reaching out to parents, Montgomery said, in an effort to keep the criminal investigation separate. But he said the district has been cooperative.

As far as the statute of limitations goes, Montgomery said with the potential charges in this particular case, his office has seven years from the time the information first came to the attention of law enforcement.

"We need parents to help their kids. We need parents to help hold offenders accountable. And we need to make sure this never happens again," Montgomery said. 



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