Republican Congressman Trent Franks' abrupt resignation amid shocking allegations that he offered a staffer $5 million to have his baby raises a bunch of questions, starting with who's Trent Franks and who might replace him?

Franks, a conservative Christian, won eight elections in his West Valley district but kept a very low public profile, beyond controversial comments on cable TV.

Now the race to fill his seat will start with a snap special primary, likely in late February or early March, followed within a few months by a special election.

On this weekend's "Sunday Square Off," political analyst Chris Herstam, a Franks contemporary at the state Capitol in the 1990s, and political consultant Barrett Marson, of Marson Media, discuss the scandal, the Republicans lining up to take his place and the odd timing of the election.

Also on this weekend's "Square Off":

-Republican School Superintendent Diane Douglas explains what she's done for Arizona teachers during her first three years in office, and why she took more than two years to disclose an audit showing her department was misallocating millions of dollars in federal money.

-Arizona Republic reporter Yvonne Wingett Sanchez discusses her story on the unelected organization whose heavy hand has been steering Arizona's school-voucher program.

"Sunday Square Off" airs at 8 a.m. Sundays on 12 News, after NBC's "Meet the Press."

Who's Trent Franks?

Political analyst Chris Herstam, a Trent Franks contemporary at the state Capitol in the 1990s, and political consultant Barrett Marson, of Marson Media, discuss the former congressman's cash-for-a-baby scandal, the Republicans lining up to take his place and the odd timing of the election.

Arizona school vouchers steered by outside group

Arizona Republic reporter Yvonne Wingett Sanchez discusses her story on the organization whose heavy hand has been steering Arizona's school-voucher program.

What Diane Douglas has done for Arizona teachers

Republican School Superintendent Diane Douglas explains what she's done for Arizona teachers and why she took two years to disclose an audit showing her department was misallocating federal money.